Archaebacteria

  • Examples; Halobacterium, Methanogens
  • Typical enviroments include extreme conditions
    • 100 degree hot springs in Yellowstone National Park.NRPobsidianpool.jpg
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  • Under conditions where no oxygen or highly acid environments in the Black SeaBlack-Sea.jpg




















  • Unicellular
  • Prokaryotes
  • Form and Metabolism are different than in any other organisms
  • Found in areas sheltered from evolutionary alteration
    • unchanging habitats
  • Resemble earth’s early environment
    • living relics
      • surviving representatives of first ages of life on earth
  • Produce methane and cluster together as a group
  • No peptidoglycan (murien) cell wall
  • Get food by sunlight, organic compounds, and inorganic compounds


Eubacteria

  • Examples; E.coli and Salmonella, Streptococci
  • "True bacteria"
    • eustructure.gif
  • Typically between 1 and 10 nanometers
  • Three basic shapes: coccus­spherical, bacillus (rod)­cylindrical, and spirillum­helical
    • shapes.gif
  • Usually all have tough cell walls
  • Unicellular
  • Found pretty much anywhere on Earth, in animals/humans, and more
  • Lactobacillus is used in dairy product conversions
  • Prokaryotic
  • 3 ways to obtain food-
    • Autotrophs
      • "self feeders"
      • make organic compounds from inorganic sources
    • Photoautotrophs
      • get energy from the sun (cyanobacteria)
    • Chemoautotrophs
      • obtain energy from inorganic chemicals



Protista

  • Examples; Slime Molds and Algae
    • image025.jpg
      • Red Algae (Seaweed)
        • seaweeds.jpg
  • include all microscopic organisms that aren't bacteria, animals, plants, or fungi
  • All have cells with a nuclei
  • Live in moist enviroments
    • habitats
      • aquatic
      – freshwater & marine
      • terrestrial
      – rotting logs, other decaying organic matter
      • aerobic
      – pond water
      • anaerobic
      – mud at bottom of lakes
      – digestive tract of animals
  • Eat 3 different main food groups
    • autotrophic
    – traditionally called algae
    • heterotrophic
    – eat bacteria, protists or organic matter
    • mixotrophic
    – combine photosynthesis and heterotrophic nutrition, as in Euglena
  • Vary so much broken down into three sub groups
    • Animal-like Protists
    • Fungus-like Protists
    • Plant-like Protists
  • Can be microscopic in size or over 300 feet long
  • Eukaryotic
  • Unicellular (for the most part- vary)



Works Cited


“Bulgaria Black Sea Coast Resorts.” Bulgaria-Trip.com. 15 Feb. 2009 <http://www.bulgaria-trips.info/aboutBG-sea.html>.

“Eubacteria .” Mercy College. 15 Feb. 2009 <http://www.mercy.edu/faculty/knizeski/eubacteria.html>.

“Humble Seaweed.” skinbeautifulblog.wordpress. 8 June 2008. 15 Feb. 2009 <http://www.pngtourism.org.pg/png/export/pics/newsletter_images/seaweeds.jpg>.

“Monera.” Spark Notes. Barnes and Nobel. 15 Feb. 2009 <http://img.sparknotes.com/figures/2/2faaa24e75677b6732cd24bf35c357da/eustructure.gif>.

“Mr. Carl’s e-Class.” Lanesville Community School Corporation. 15 Feb. 2009 <http://www.lanesville.k12.in.us/LCSYellowpages/Tickit/Carl/protists.html>.

“The Six Kingdoms.” Rhode Island College. 15 Feb. 2009 <http://www.ric.edu/faculty/ptiskus/Six_Kingdoms/Index.htm>.

Waggoner, Ben. “Introduction to the Archaea.” The University of California Museum of Paleontology . 15 Feb. 2009 <http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/archaea/archaea.html>.